Child custody issues in Massachusetts may become complicated, and you could even face an accusation of abducting your own children just by traveling with them outside of the Pilgrim State. If your ex-spouse believes you may be taking your child across state lines without his or her permission, the U.S. Department of State notes that a court order to stop the trip might be obtained. At the Law Offices of Andrew S. Guisbond, our focus is on family matters involving custody disputes such as traveling safely to another state or country with your children in tow.

Before making any travel plans that involve your children, you may need to request a modification of the custody order with the court. While your rights as a non-custodial parent might include traveling with your children, there may be a limit to how many miles away from your residence you may actually go. Venturing further than the originally specified limits may require modifying your custody order so that it documents how many miles you may travel.

For a non-custodial parent planning on relocating to another state or country, modifying your visitation rights might be necessary. You may need to request joint custody if you plan on having your child stay with you for an extended period of time. Filling out an application in your new country for your child to acquire dual citizenship may be an additional requirement.

If you are in possession of a legal document outlining the places your children are visiting with you, you may prevent any accusations of abduction. Providing your ex-spouse with a schedule and travel itineraries may also help in reducing worries regarding the children’s safety or whereabouts.

Our page on child custody page provides more information on resolving and preventing conflicts.